BOSTON (AP) — Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick and a congressional leader say security will be tight as thousands of runners and hundreds of thousands of spectators crowd Boston's streets today for the annual Marathon.

Patrick tells CBS' "Face the Nation" that Boston may be the safest place in America on Monday.

The governor says officials are striking a balance between more security and maintaining the city's festive spirit. Patrick won't specify the steps being taken to boost security, but says there will be a "considerably more police presence."

Rep. Michael McCaul, chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee, tells ABC's "This Week" that cameras, police, police dogs and bomb detecting equipment will make Boston "well-fortified."

McCaul, a Republican from Texas, says he is concerned about the possibility of a copycat attack.

The Boston Red Sox held an emotional 20-minute pregame ceremony honoring victims of the Boston Marathon bombings along with law enforcement officials, medical personnel, runners and race volunteers before Sunday night's game against the Baltimore Orioles.

With canvasses of handwritten notes from each of the 50 states being held on the outfield warning track from the left field corner in front of the Green Monster around to the Pesky Pole, a number of victims came walking in from the left-field corner to a loud ovation.

Just over a year ago, two bombs exploded near the finish line — less than a mile from Fenway Park, killing three and injuring over 260 others.

State and local officials are hoping for a safe but still enjoyable day for the 36,000 runners planning to participate today and the hundreds of thousands of spectators.