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Ice fishing is big on many lakes in Minnesota during the winter but some anglers on Upper Red Lake are also leaving a big, disgusting mess.

What is with some people? That's the question lake owners and the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (DNR) are asking right now as they deal with the mess left behind by some ice fishers up north.

While some ice anglers have been known to leave litter like empty beer cans, old food wrappers and empty bait containers, the waste left behind on Upper Red Lake (which is about six hours northwest of Rochester, north of Bemidji) is truly disgusting.

Check it out: DNR conservation officer Nicholas Prachar noted in his weekly report they've been dealing with complaints about people dumping... raw sewage... on Upper Red Lake.

Eww! Sewage?!? Seriously?!? Check it out:

Numerous complaints were fielded about people with RV-style wheelhouses who dump their sewage on the ice as they leave the lake. One contact was made with a suspect. Sewage and litter continue to be an issue on area lakes.

It's gotten so bad that BringMeTheNews reports that the Upper Red Lake Area Association even addressed the trend on its website and posted this note (which seems pretty obvious, if you have any common sense):

During the winter fishing season, an increase in recreational vehicles and people on the frozen lakes is resulting in an increase in the leftovers of human activity. Human waste does not belong on the ice, under the ice or along our shorelines!

The story said area property owners are working with the DNR to make it easier for angles to get rid of their waste properly. But, come on, right? Don't dump your sewage on the lake, people!

Speaking of lakes, Minnesota has more than 10,000 of them, right? And some of their names are a little tricky to pronounce-- unless you're a true Minnesotan, of course. Keep scrolling to see how many YOU know how to say.

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SAY WHAT? 20 of the Hardest Lake Names to Pronounce in Minnesota