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Waseca, MN (KROC AM News) - Farmers in southeast Minnesota are expected to be super busy the next week as they will finally have decent weather for their spring planting.

Recent cold and wet weather has kept many from getting into their fields, unlike a year ago

The latest Weekly Crop and Weather report from the University of Minnesota Southern Research and Outreach Center in Waseca shows what farmers have been dealing with. The center says “The weather this week did not allow for any progress on the 2022 cropping season. “

 

The report shows the average temperature of 46 degrees was nearly 6 degrees cooler than normal. Rainfall totaled 1.66 inches or 3/4ths of an inch above normal.

Soil temperatures at the 2- or 4-inch depth were still in the mid 40’s or nine degrees colder than normal.

The center says “There was no progress on corn or soybean planting this week.”

But that will change over the next several days as a wave of very warm and mostly dry weather will move into the region on Monday.

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University of Minnesota Southern Research and Outreach Center
University of Minnesota
Southern Research and Outreach Center
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The weekly report covers a 50 to 100-mile radius of Waseca.

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