It's not a common sight to see a wolf in the Midwest. It's even more rare to see a black wolf, but that's exactly what a trail cam just captured in Minnesota.

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I saw this video trending on Digg today and I completely understand why. This is a beautiful animal that was spotted by the Voyageurs Wolf Project. They are located in northern Minnesota (hence, all of that snow still hanging around) and shared this black wolf that was seen on one of their many trail cameras in the northern regions of the Midwest.

The group added this backstory about how this wolf is one they've never seen before:

We rarely see black wolves in our area so seeing this black wolf with its seemingly shaggy coat, especially around its legs and feet, was pretty neat! The wolf hung out in front of the camera for a while before heading on its way. This wolf was a lone wolf just passing through our area. None of the ~19 packs we are currently studying have black pack members in them.

How rare are black wolves?

Wolf.org says that less than 4% of wolves in the wild are black in color (or lack thereof). Some estimates say it could be as few as 2% of wolves that share this wolf's coat color (although technically black isn't a color, it's an absence of color, but I digress).

This is one of the many reasons why I highly recommend following Voyageurs Wolf Project on YouTube as they frequently share interesting wildlife moments like this one.

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